In the News

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

motivational interviewing, motivational interviewing training

Where mistrust between communities and law enforcement runs high, can people with criminal histories bridge the gap?

What We Don't Know About Parole and Probation

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

motivational interviewing, motivational interviewing training

As we move away from mass incarceration, we need to figure out how visits by case officers are effective -- or aren't.

Magic Valley probation officers try new approach

Reporting for Work Where You Once Reported for Probation

Court-Mandated Substance Abuse Treatment: Exploring the Ethics and Efficacy

motivational interviewing, motivational interviewing training

Local probation and parole officers have shifted their focus in recent years from the traditionally reactive approach taken by officers to a more proactive, personal approach that’s heavy on conversations and self-reflection.

Court-Mandated Substance Abuse Treatment: Exploring the Ethics and Efficacy

Keeping people out of crisis: Unit combines law enforcement, mental health worker

Court-Mandated Substance Abuse Treatment: Exploring the Ethics and Efficacy

motivational interviewing, motivational interviewing training

 Several US states mandate that people with addiction enter treatment against their will, and that trend is expanding.

Redefining the Role of Probation and Parole Officers to Combat Recidivism

Keeping people out of crisis: Unit combines law enforcement, mental health worker

Keeping people out of crisis: Unit combines law enforcement, mental health worker

motivational interviewing, motivational interviewing training

Every year, it’s estimated that 650,000 offenders are released from the nation’s prisons, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. However, national recidivism rates remain high, with some studies finding that two-thirds of inmates are re-arrested. 

Keeping people out of crisis: Unit combines law enforcement, mental health worker

Keeping people out of crisis: Unit combines law enforcement, mental health worker

Keeping people out of crisis: Unit combines law enforcement, mental health worker

motivational interviewing, motivational interviewing training

“The key to motivational interviewing is, it really is about behavior change and it’s about helping a person understand whether or not their behavior is in alignment with what their values are.” 

Published Studies

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Motivational Interviewing Fidelity in a Community Corrections Setting

Counselor MI consistent relational skills were an important predictor of client treatment initiation. Counselor behaviors such as empathy and MI spirit may be important for developing client rapport with people in a probation setting.

Motivational Interviewing for Probation Officers: Tipping the Balance Toward Change

This article will suggest several benefits from the importation of Motivational Interviewing into

probation practice. This article posits eight reasons to consider the Motivational Interviewing

approach.

Motivational Interviewing: A useful skill for correctional staff?

The following paper will provide: a description of what MI is; what we know about how it works; a discussion of MI training and implementation within organisations, and some challenges when engaging in MI within a correctional setting.

Motivational interviewing with offenders: A systematic review

MI can lead to improved retention in treatment, enhanced motivation to change, and reduced offending, although there are variations across studies. To advance the study of MI with offenders, a theory of change needs to be articulated on which testable hypotheses may be based. The integrity of treatment in its application needs to be assured. Based on these foundations, more outcome research is needed to examine who responds to what type of MI in relation to treatment retention, readiness to change, and reconviction.

Motivational Interviewing as a Supervision Strategy in Probation: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial

 total of 380 probationers were assigned to officers during a 4-month period; offender outcomes included the probability of having a drug-positive urinalysis or an otherwise poor outcome after 6 months. The MI training program improved officer skill as measured by standardized interactions. However, after controlling for baseline characteristics, probationer outcome did not vary by training group, nor did officer MI competence predict outcome. Results are discussed in terms of the role of MI in the overall probation system.

Probation Officer–Probation Agency Fit: Understanding Disparities in the Use of MI

The current study focused on interactions between 834 probation officers and their agencies (six probation jurisdictions) by examining alignment between the use of client-centered communication strategies, perceived agency support, and agency climate. Results showed a significant, negative linear relationship between probation officer-agency alignment with regard to EBPs and agency context.

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The Right to Silence and the Permission to Talk: Motivational Interviewing and High-Value Detainees

Overall, this research provides unique evidence for the use of specific skills and approaches that can increase or decrease HVD engagement and information provided.

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Study Provides Insight into 'Rapport-Building' During Victim Interviews

The observing rapport-based interpersonal techniques (ORBIT) framework analyses rapport-based interviewing skills along two dimensions: motivational interviewing (MI) skills and interpersonal competence (use of adaptive interviewing behaviors and absence of maladaptive interviewing behaviors).

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